Step-by-Step Guide to assign Reserved IP address to Azure VM

In azure all the IP address assignments are dynamic by default. Which means IP addresses can change in restart. There are 2 methods you can use to assign IP address to a VM in azure. its dynamic and static

Why we need static IP addresses ?

1) Application requirements – sometime applications need to connect with fixed IP address. For example, if it’s a database VM it’s important to have static IP address so application settings always can refer to that. 

2) Security – when VM uses static IP addresses we can create firewall rules easily. So there is more control over traffic flow as well. 

In azure, static IP address (public) is count as a service so there will be addition charge for it. 

In azure there is 2 methods to deploy and manage a VM. 

1) By Using Classic Mode

2) By Using Resources Manager 

Assigning a static IP address (public) is different for these 2 methods. In this blog post I am going to demonstrate how to do it using both modes. 

Assign Static IP Address in classic deployment model

Before we start need to make sure following prerequisites are in place. 

Global Administrator account for the Azure Subscription

Azure PowerShell Module installed in local computer – you can download it from http://aka.ms/webpi-azps

In my demo I got a classic virtual machine running and it’s got dynamic public IP address assigned. In demo I am going to show how we can make it as reserved IP address. 

1) Log in to PC where Azure PowerShell Module installed and open the powershell as administrator

2) Then type Add-AzureAccount and press enter

3) Then it will prompt for the azure credential and login as global administrator

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4) Then type New-AzureReservedIP –ReservedIPName DCM01ReservedIP –Location "East US" -ServiceName DCM01  – in the command DCM01ReservedIP is the name for the reserved IP address and Location define the location of the IP address ( can be US, Europe etc.). 

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5) Now it’s done and when I go to DCM01 VM now its shows the IP address as reserved. 

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6) Also in power shell type Get-AzureReservedIP and it will show the reserved IP details 

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Using Resource Manager deployment mode

In the resource manager I have a VM running and the public address by default. I need to change it to static. 

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1) To change click on the VM from the virtual machine container 

2) Then click on the public IP address and DNS name

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3) Then it will load the configuration and to change click on the configuration option

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4) It will then list down the public IP configuration, as can see by default its dynamic to set it to static need to click on static option and click on save. This will make the IP address static.

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Hope this post was helpful and if you have any question feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com 

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STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO AZURE AD PRIVILEGED IDENTITY MANAGEMENT – PART 2

In my previous post on this series I have explain about azure AD privileged identity management including its features and how to get it enabled. If you not read it yet you can find it using this link.

in this post I am going to show you more of its features and capabilities. 

How to manage privileged roles?

The main point of the identity management is that administrators will have the required privileges when they needed. In part 1 of the post billing administrators and service administrator roles were eligible for the Identity management. So it will remove its permanent permissions which is assigned to role. 

So if you still need to make one of the account permanent administrator let’s see how we can do it. 

Log in to the azure portal as global administrator (it should be associated with relevant AD instance)

Open the azure identity management from portal

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Then click on managed privileged roles

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In next page it will list down the summary of the roles. Let’s assume we need to make one of the billing administrators “permanent”. To do that click on billing administrators

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It will list down the users which is eligible for the role and click on the account you need to make permanent. 

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Then click on more in next page and click on option make perm

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Once completed its shows as permanent

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Same way we can add an administrator to the roles. To do it go to roles, if you need to add new role it can do too. Click on roles on the manage privileges roles page

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Then click on add

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Then from roles click on the role you going to add

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Then under the select users, select the user using search and click on done

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How to activate roles?

Now we have the roles but how we can use them with time bound activation (Just in time administration

Go to the role page again like in previous page. In my demo I am going to use service administrator role

Then click on settings

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In next window we can see that option to define the time. Also we can enable notifications so email notification will send to admin in event of role activation. Also option to request ticket or incident number. This is important to justify the privileged access. Also can use the multifactor authentication in activation to make sure the request is legitimate. 

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Once you satisfied with settings, click on save to apply. 

Then for the testing I logged in as the security administrator to the azure portal. 

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Then go to the privileged identity management page

Click on the service administrator 

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Then click on the activate button, to activate the role

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According to the settings its asking for ticket number for activation. Once put the information click on ok

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Perfect, now its saying when it expires and it also shows the that roles been activated

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Now I change the login and logged back as global administrator.

Then if go to privileged management page and click on audit history you can see all the events. 

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Hope this series add knowledge about azure AD privileged identity management and if you have any questions feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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Step-by-Step Guide to Azure AD Privileged Identity Management – Part 1

Privileged Identity Management is boarder topic to discuss with. First thing first do not think it as another feature or product from Microsoft. The way I see it as a lot of methodologies, technologies came together and making a new process. I am saying it because with this concept we need to rethink about how current identities been managed in infrastructure. Administrators, users need to change the way they think about the permissions. 

In any infrastructure we have different type of administrators. It can be domain administrators, local administrators, service administrators. If its hybrid setup it may have cloud administrators too. The question is do you have fully control over these accounts and its permissions? do you aware of their activities using these permissions? how do you know it’s not been compromised already? If I say solution is to revoke these administrator privileges yes it will work but problem is how much additional work to restore this permission when needed? and also how practical it is? it’s also have a social impact too, if you walk down to your users and say that I’m going to revoke your admin privileges what will be their response? 

Privileged access management is not a new topic it’s been in industry for long but problem is still not lot considering about it. Microsoft step up and introduce new products, concepts to bring it forward again as this is definitely needed in current infrastructures to address modern threats towards identities. The good thing about this new tools and technologies, its more automated and the user accounts will have the required permissions whenever they needed. In your infrastructure this can achieve using Microsoft identity manager 2016 but need lot more work with new concepts which I will explain in future posts. Microsoft introduce same concept to the azure cloud as well. In this post we going to look in to this new feature. 

Using azure privileged identity management, we can manage, control and monitor the permissions to the azure resources such as azure AD, office 365, intune and SaaS applications. Identity management will help to do following,

Identify the current azure AD administrators your azure subscriptions have

Just-in-Time administration – This is something I really like. Now you can assign administration permissions on demand for period of time. For example, user A can be office 365 administrator for 11am to 12pm. Once the time limit reach system will revoke the administrator privileges automatically

Reports to view the privileged accounts access history and changes in administrator assignments

Alerts when access to privileged role

Azure AD privileged identity management can manage following organizational roles,

Global Administrator – Has access to all administrative features. The person who signs up for the Azure account becomes a global administrator. Only global administrators can assign other administrator roles. There can be more than one global administrator at your company.

Billing Administrator – Makes purchases, manages subscriptions, manages support tickets, and monitors service health.

Service Administrator – Manages service requests and monitors service health.

User Administrator – Resets passwords, monitors service health, and manages user accounts, user groups, and service requests. Some limitations apply to the permissions of a user management administrator. For example, they cannot delete a global administrator or create other administrators. Also, they cannot reset passwords for billing, global, and service administrators.

Password Administrator – Resets passwords, manages service requests, and monitors service health. Password administrators can reset passwords only for users and other password administrators.

Let’s see how to enable azure AD privileged identity management,
Before start make sure you got global administrator privileges to the azure AD directory that you going to enable this feature.
 
1) Log in to the azure portal as global administrator
2) Go to New > Security + Identity > Azure AD privileged identity management 
 
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3) Then click on create to start the process
 
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4) In first step it will identify the privileged roles exist in current directory. In my demo I have 3 roles. In same page you can view what are these accounts by clicking on each role. After review click on next
 
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5) In next window its list which accounts eligible for activate the roles. Select the account you want and click on next
 
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6) In next window can review the changes. As per my selection only one account will remain as permanent admin. To complete click on OK
 
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7) Once it’s done, you can load the console from the dashboard. 
 
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In part 2 of the post I will explain what we can do with it in details. 
If you got any questions feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com
 
Reference :  https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/active-directory-privileged-identity-management-configure/

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Get Started with Azure Security Center

Whenever we talk about cloud, one of the main questions still comes from customers is “what about security?“. Azure cloud built by using SDL (Security Development Lifecycle) from initial planning to product launch. It’s continues uses different measurements, safeguards to protect the infrastructures and customer data. You can find details about azure security on https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/TrustCenter/Security/AzureSecurity

Microsoft releases Azure Security Center to allow you to prevent, detect and respond to the threats against you azure resources with more visibility. Based on your requirements, can use different policies with resources groups.

Azure security center capabilities focused on 3 areas (https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/security-center-intro/),

Capabilities

Details

Prevent

·         Monitors the security state of your Azure resources

·         Defines policies for your Azure subscriptions and resource groups based on your company’s security requirements, the types of applications that you use, and the sensitivity of your data

·         Uses policy-driven security recommendations to guide service owners through the process of implementing needed controls

·         Rapidly deploys security services and appliances from Microsoft and partners

 

Detect

·         Automatically collects and analyzes security data from your Azure resources, the network, and partner solutions like antimalware programs and firewalls

·         Leverages global threat intelligence from Microsoft products and services, the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit (DCU), the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC), and external feeds

·         Applies advanced analytics, including machine learning and behavioral analysis

 

Respond

·         Provides prioritized security incidents/alerts

·         Offers insights into the source of the attack and impacted resources

·         Suggests ways to stop the current attack and help prevent future attacks

Azure Security Center currently in Preview but it’s still worth to try and see its capabilities.
Let’s see how we can enable and start using it.

1)    You need to have valid azure subscription and you need to log in as global administrator.
2)    Then go to browse and type security. There you can see security center. Click on there to start.

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3)    Then we can see the main window.

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4)    If it’s red something not right :) to start with lets click on virtual machines.

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5)    As we can see the data collection off. We need data collect from VM to detect the problems. Let’s go ahead and enable data collection.
6)    Click on Policy tile, and then it will load up the policy page. As can see data collection is off.  Click on the policy.

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7)    Click on “On” and then click on Save

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8)    After that we can see the recommendations based on collected data and security policy.  We can follow each recommendation and fix the security threats.

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How to apply custom policy for the different resources?

1)    By default the default prevention policy will be inherited to all the resources. But we can apply custom policy based on the requirement. To start with click on policy tile again, and click on the arrow next to policy to list the resources. As we can see security policy inherited.

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2)    To change, click on the resource to select, and in next tile, for the inherit policy click “unique” and click on “Save

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3)    After save, click on prevention policy

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4)    There you can change the policy settings and click ok to apply the policy settings.

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5)    This new settings are unique for the resource now.

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Enable Email Notifications

You can enable notifications in azure security center so if any issues detected you will get notifications. It’s currently runs with limited features.
Currently it can only enable on default prevention policy.

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Hope this article helps and if you got any question feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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Azure Rights Management (Azure RMS) – Part 1

Microsoft Right management service help organizations to protect organization’s sensitive data getting unauthorized access. This service been used on-premises active directory infrastructures in years and it’s also available in azure.

If you not familiar with RMS let me explain it in simpler way. Let’s say user A got a document which contain some sensitive data about company stock prices. User A sending it to User B. This we know should be a conversation between user A and B. and how we can verify these data not been to pass to another user? What if someone gets a printed copy of this document? What if the user B edit this and add some false information? Using RMS you can prevent those. RMS can use to encrypt, managed identities and apply authorization policies in to your files and emails. The files you can define to open only by the person who you wished to open it, set it to read-only and also prevent user from printing it.

Using Azure RMS you can integrate the above features with your cloud applications, office 365 to protect the confidential data.

azrms_elements

In order to enable the Azure RMS you need the following prerequisites.

1)    Valid Azure Subscription – You need to have valid azure subscription to start with. If you not have paid version you still can start with a trial.
2)    Azure AD – You must have Azure AD configured to have RMS. I have written articles about how to get Azure AD services enable and you can simply search the blog if you need help with it. Also you can integrate it with your on-premises Ad infrastructure.
3)    RMS Supported Devices – you need to have devices runs with RMS supported OS to use this features. The list is available at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/rights-management/get-started/requirements-client-devices
4)    RMS Supported Applications – to use RMS features its need to be used with RMS supported applications. The list is available here https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/rights-management/get-started/requirements-client-devices

Once you are ready with above first step is to enable the Azure RMS Service.
1)    Log in to the Azure Portal with a privileged account
2)    Go to Brows and then type rms, then it will list the RMS service then click on it.

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3)    It will load the classic portal. In here you can see all the azure Ad instance running and its RMS service status. In my demo I do not have any instance enable with RMS.

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4)    To enable the RMS service, select the AD instance and the click on “Activate” button in the bottom of the page.

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Once it’s activated we have RMS enabled. In next part of the article let’s see how to use its features.

If you have any questions feel free to get back to me on rebeladm@live.com

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Step-by-Step Guide to create Organizational Unit (OU) in Azure AD Domain Service Managed Domain

Organizational unit in active directory is a container where you can place users, computers, groups and other organization units even. OU are helps to create logical structure of the AD. You can use it to assign group policies and manage the resources.  This is common procedure in in-house domain environment, but what about the Azure managed domain? Can engineers use same method?

Answer is YES, but with some limitations. It is managed domain so you do not have full control over the functions such as complex group policies etc. I will explain those in later article but for the Organizational units, we can create those and manage those in azure managed domain. There is no option in azure portal to create this, this need to be created using a PC, server which is connected to the Azure Ad managed domain.

I wrote an article about adding a VM to the Azure managed domain. It is good place to start with http://www.rebeladmin.com/2016/05/step-step-guide-manage-azure-active-directory-domain-service-aad-ds-managed-domain-using-virtual-server/ . To create OU, you must have this done before start.

You also need be a member of AAD DC Administrators group.

Let’s see how we can create OU.

In my demo I am using a windows 2016 TP5 server which is connected to managed domain. Also I logged in as a member of AAD DC Administrators group.

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Also I have already installed AD DS and AD LDS Tools (Remote server administration tools > Role administration tools > AD DS and AD LDS Tools)

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To start the process, go to Server Manager > Tools > Active Directory Administrative Center

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In left hand side in the console click on the managed domain

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In the right hand under the Tasks click on New > Organizational Unit

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In next window we can provide the information about new OU and click OK to complete.

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Then you can see the new OU added.

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By default the user account I used for to create the OU got full permissions to control the OU.

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Now you can create new users, groups under this OU. But keep in mind you CANNOT move any users, groups which is already under AADDC users OU. It’s the default OU for the users, groups added via azure portal.

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Also the users and groups added under new OU will not be visible on azure portal. It’s only valid inside the managed domain environment.

Hope this article was helpful. If you got any questions feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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Step-by-Step guide to enable Secure LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) on Azure AD managed domain

In active directory environment, LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is responsible for read and write data from AD. By default LDAP traffic transmitted un-secure. You can make this secured transmit based on SSL. In security prospective even in more “local” network it’s important to make secure even though most of engineers not using it. But when you have hybrid or cloud only setup this is more important. Idea of this post is to demonstrate how to enable secure LDAP on Azure AD managed domain.

There is few prerequisite required to perform this task.

1)    Azure AD Domain Service – Azure AD domain service must be enabled and configured with all prerequisite. If you need any help over please refer to my last few posts which explain how to configure.
2)    SSL Certificate – It is need to have valid SSL certificate and it need to be from valid certificate authority such as public certificate authority, enterprise certificate authority. Also you can still use self-sign SSL certificate.

In my demo,
1)    I have already configured a Azure AD managed domain and running with active subscription

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2)    I got an Azure VM connected to Azure managed domain and I will be using it to demonstrate to enable Secure LDAP.
3)    I am going to use self-signed certificate to create the secure LDAP

Create self-signed certificate

1)    Log in to domain joined server, or PC and open windows power-shell session as administrator.
2)    Execute following

$validtill=Get-Date
New-SelfSignedCertificate -Subject *.rebeladmin.onmicrosoft.com -NotAfter $validtill.AddDays(365) -KeyUsage DigitalSignature, KeyEncipherment -Type SSLServerAuthentication -DnsName *.rebeladmin.onmicrosoft.com

In here you can replace rebeladmin.onmicrosoft.com with your managed domain name.

This will generate the self-sign certificate.

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Export the SSL Certificate

Now we have the certificate, but we need to export it to use to enable secure LDAP.
1)    Log in to the PC or Server which generated certificate as administrator
2)    Go to run > mmc

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3)    File > Add/remove Snap-in

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4)    Select Certificates and click on button Add

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5)    Then select the Computer Account and click next

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6)    Select local computer and click on finish

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7)    Click on OK to open the certificate mmc

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8)    Then in console go to Personal > Certificates and you can see the new self-signed certificate we just created in previous step

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9)    Right click on the certificate and click on All tasks > export

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10)    Then its start the certificate export wizard, click on next to start

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11)    In this window select option “Yes, export the private key” and click on next
12)    Leave the .pfx option selected and click next

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13)    In next window define a password and click on next

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14)    Then define the location to save the file and click on next

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15)    Click on finish to complete the export process

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Enable Secure LDAP

Now we got the SSL exported and ready. Now it’s time to enable the secure LDAP.
1)    Log in to the azure portal and load the Azure Domain Services configuration page for your relevant directory

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2)    Then to the domain service section and click on “configure certificate” button

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3)    Then brows for the .pfx file we just exported and provide the password, then click ok to proceed

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4)    After few minutes we can see the secure LDAP is enabled

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5)    The next step is to enable the secure LDAP connection over the internet for your managed domain. For that click on the “Yes” for the option “Enable secure LDAP access over the internet” and the click save

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6)    After few minute we can see the feature is enabled and also displaying the public ip address which can use on this.

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7)    If you wish to use secure ldap over the internet you need to create DNS entry in your dns provider and create A record to point domain to the public ip address its given.

Hope this was helpful post and if you have any question on this feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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Step-by-Step Guide to exclude user or user group from group policy

After few sick weeks I am back in blogging :). In an active directory infrastructure some time you may need to exclude user or user group from a group policy. It can be due to application setting or system setting. Sometime I seen administrators create separate OU and move users there just to get user exclude from particular group policy. It is not necessary to create new OU to exclude users from GPO. In this post I am going to demonstrate how you can exclude a user or group from a GPO.

1)    Log in to a server with administrator privileges (it can be DC server or a server with group policy management feature installed on). I am using windows server 2016 TP5 DC for the demo.
2)    Open the Group policy mmc with server manager > tools > group policy management

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3)    Then expand the tree and go to the group policy that you like to exclude users or group. In my demo it’s going to be GP called Test1

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4)    Click on the selected GPO and in right hand panel it will list the settings. Click on delegation tab.

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5)    Then click on the Advanced button

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6)    In window, click on add to add the user or the group that you like to exclude

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7)    Then in the permission list, you can see by default Read permission is allowed. Leave it same and scroll down the list to select permission called Apply group policy. Then click on deny permission.

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8)    Then click on OK to apply the changes. In warning message click on Yes. Now we successfully exclude user2 from the Test1 GPO.

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Hope this post informative and if you got any questions feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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Step-by-Step Guide to manage DNS records in Azure Managed Domain (AAD-DS)

In my recent articles I was explaining how to enable Azure Active Directory Domain Service and how to manage its services using domain-joined server.

If you not read it yet please check my last post in here.

When you manage a local active directory instance, using DNS mmc you can manage the DNS records. But can we do same with Azure managed domain? Answer is yes. In this post I am going to show how to manage dns records using domain-joined azure vm.

In order to do that we need following prerequisites.

1)    Azure Active Directory Domain Service (AAD-DS) managed domain Instance
2)    Domain Joined Virtual Server
3)    User account with member of AAD DC Administrators group

I have explain all of above in my last 3-4 posts. Please follow them if you like to know more about those.
So in this demo, I am going to use the already setup Azure managed domain instance.

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I also have a virtual server running on Azure with windows server 2016 TP5. It is already jointed to the managed domain.

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To start with the configuration RDP to the virtual server

1)    Log in to server with member account of AAD DC Administrators group

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2)    Open Server Manager > Add Roles and Features

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3)    In first screen of wizard click on next to proceed

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4)    In next window keep the default and click next

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5)    In server selection keep it default and click next

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6)    In server roles keep default and click next

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7)    Under the features, go to Remote Server Administration Tools > Roles Administration Tools > DNS Server Tools. Then click next to proceed

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8)    In next confirmation window click on install to install the tools

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9)    Once it’s done go to server manager > tools > DNS

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10)    On first start it will prompt where to connect. In their select the option as below and then type the managed domain you have in place. Then click ok

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11)    It will open up the DNS mmc.

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In here we can manage the DNS records as we need. There are some dns records which related to the managed domain service. So make sure those records are not modified or deleted.

The virtual machine no need to be on server version, if you install desktop version you can still managed dns by installing RSAT tools.

If you have any questions about the post feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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Step-by-Step Guide to manage Azure Active Directory Domain Service (AAD-DS) managed domain using Virtual Server

In my last two blog post I explain how to enable Azure Active Directory Domain Service and how to configure it properly. If you still not read those you can find those in following links.

Step-by-Step Guide to enable Azure AD Domain Services

Step-by-Step Guide to enable password synchronization to Azure Active Directory Domain Services (AAD DS)

In this post I am going to demonstrate how to add a virtual server which is setup on azure in to the managed domain and how to use Active Directory administration tools to manage the AAD-DS managed domain.

One thing I need to make clear is since it’s a managed domain services you do not going to have same manageability as in house domain controller.

According to Microsoft

Administrative tasks you can perform on a managed domain

•    Join machines to the managed domain.
•    Configure the built-in GPO for the 'AADDC Computers' and 'AADDC Users' containers in the managed domain.
•    Administer DNS on the managed domain.
•    Create and administer custom Organizational Units (OUs) on the managed domain.
•    Gain administrative access to computers joined to the managed domain.

Administrative privileges you do not have on a managed domain

•    You are not granted Domain Administrator or Enterprise Administrator privileges for the managed domain.
•    You cannot extend the schema of the managed domain.
•    You cannot connect to domain controllers for the managed domain using Remote Desktop.
•    You cannot add domain controllers to the managed domain.

Create VM

As the first step I am going to setup new VM under the same virtual network as the managed domain.

1)    In order to join VM to the same virtual network, we have to use Azure classic portal to build the VM.
2)    Log in to the azure classic portal > New > Compute > Virtual Machine > From Gallery ( The reason is using this option can define the advanced options)

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3)    Then select the template from the list. I am going to use windows server 2016 TP 5. Click on arrow to proceed.

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4)    In next window provide the info for the new VM (such as name, resources and local admin account) and click proceed arrow.

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5)    In Next window select the Virtual network as same as the one you setup the AAD-DS managed domain. If you do not select correct virtual network you will not be able to connect this vm to the managed domain. Once done, click on button to proceed.

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6)    In next window can add the extensions you like and click to button to setup the vm.

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Connect VM to the Managed Domain

1)    Once New VM is up and running, click on connect to log in to the VM

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2)    Now the server is ready, next step is to join it to the domain.

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3)    In domain, type the managed domain name and type the credentials. The use account used for authentication should be member of AAD DC Administrators group ( I explain on my first article how to setup this group)

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4)    Once connected to the domain, reboot it to complete the process.

Manage domain using AD administration tools

In this step I am going to install AD admin tools using that we can manage the Azure managed domain.
Note – This also can do using desktop operating system as well. Ex- windows 10. To do it, need to install RSAT for windows 10. (https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/download/details.aspx?id=45520)

1)    Log in to the server as member of AAD DC Administrators group
2)    Server Manager > Add Roles and Features

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3)    Click next in the wizard

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4)    In next window keep the default and click next

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5)    In next window keep the default and click next to proceed

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6)    On the roles page, keep default values and click next

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7)    In features select Remote server administration tools > Role administration tools > AD DS and AD LDS Tools and then click next to proceed.

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8)    In next window click on install to proceed with the installation

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9)    Once install done go to Server Manager > Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers
Here we can see the AD console which Admins familiar with.

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Hope this is helpful and if you have any question feel free to contact me on rebeladm@live.com

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